Home

Welcome to

Cairdeall

Latest from the Blog

Taliesin the Bard

Taliesin is probably the most famous Bard to have lived. He lived between 534 and 599 and was chief Bard in the courts of at least three kings of Britain. He is associated with the Book of Taliesin, a text from the 10th century that contains some of his poems. You can actually view this […]

Sacred Groves

Roman scholars writing about the Druids made notes on the use of Sacred Groves and the importance of them to the early Druids. In ancient times, they were a place of sanctuary and worship, natural temples. They were tranquil and comforting. Druids would use them as places to meditate, reflect and seek comfort. Druids today […]

The Bards

What does it mean to be a Bard in the 21st Century? What values and qualities does the Bard represent? Where is the Bard in me? These are some of the questions the Bardic course asks me to explore. The Bardic grade is about going back to the wisdom of the ancestors, back in time […]

Lascaux Caves

One of the best pieces of evidence we have for early spirituality is in the caves at Lascaux, France. Deep inside magnificent paintings have been discovered of boars, bisons, bulls, bears and horses. The paintings have been dated to the palaeolithic era (between 28,000 BC and 10,000 BC). It is believed that in this era, […]

The Salmon

No traitor, the salmon. He returns to his home. When you’re tired of searching there, you’ll find the answer here. From 4th Century Welsh – quoted in OBOD Gwers Two I love this quote at the start of the second introductory Gwersi. It’s all about not going wandering searching for answers when all the answers […]

Life Plans

The Gwers I am studying today starts off with this saying: “Everything works out more perfectly than I plan it”. OBOD Introductory Gwers Two How much do we get to influence our own lives? Does planning make a difference or is life already set on a route for us? This question has interested philosophers for […]

Eisteddfod

Eisteddfod is a Welsh word that roughly translates to a gathering to listen to poetry, songs and stories. The closest English word is ‘session’ but it is much more than a session. It is a meeting of souls that share the Arts together. Through developing awareness of stories, poems, music, paintings and arts we develop […]

Triads

A triad is a short three-fold saying that shares wisdom. They are common in Welsh and Irish sayings. Some are thought to be from the ancient Druid time, other are from more modern writers who were inspired by the ancients. The number three is considered a number of good fortune, harmony, wisdom and understanding. The […]

Brief History of Druidry

History in 250 words…… Druidry has an interesting and turbulent history. There are four eras: Proto-Druidry, Classical, Underground and the later Revival Druidry. There is no distinct beginning that we know of. It is thought the practice developed from early human spirituality which was animistic and shamanistic. Thanks to classical authors of the Greeks and […]

Why Druidry?

Druidry is not that new to me, I have been interested in reading about them for years but as a casual interest rather than serious study. It is only recently when I started exploring Philosophy of Religion to a greater depth and questioning my own spiritual beliefs to a high level that I started looking […]

Cairdeas

Cairdeas (pronounced ‘cardis’) is a Gaelic word meaning world-wide friendship and fellowship. It stems from the old Irish word cairdes which implies a strong friendship, almost kinship and familial. The people you love and live with and work alongside. Those that you form strong bonds with. Almost marriage like in some cases. People are meant […]

Introducing Cairdeall

This blog came about as I wanted a place to document my research and reflections as I studied Druidry. It is my own personal project, opinion based but I hope will build to be a great resource and anthology in all things Druid. The name Cairdeall comes from my real first initial ‘C’ and the […]

It is important to live as we are always on the eve of a great discovery and prepare to welcome it as completely, intimately and ardently as we can.

Maeterlink